Science and Religion: Opposing Forces?

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“In Science, we have been reading only the notes to a poem; in Christianity, we find the poem itself.”

– C.S. Lewis

I was sitting in Biology class when the topic of God came up. I don’t remember what led to the conversation we had with our teacher, a young man in his thirties who I admired deeply. It was my favorite class, one that I thrived in because we were able to learn through exploration. We would hike out into the wetlands, catching fish, bird watching, sketching what we saw, far away from the sound of a school bell or the passing of cars.

My teacher was a Baptist, or at least that is the conclusion he came to in-between the moments when his Faith faltered. I could see in his heart of hearts that he was first a scientist, a man driven by sight.

That day, his faith was faltering and he said to the class that he believed Christians were close-minded, that they refused to open their eyes and face the truth. I didn’t reply to this statement, though I felt that he himself had closed his mind that day. I really don’t know if he ever went back to that Baptist church, maybe he did physically, but where was his heart?

Since that day, I have considered what he said, and have come to the realization that I have been quite open-minded about a lot of things, popular science including. To be honest, in school you really don’t get to decide what you learn about, what you have to write as answers upon the exams. Often, you must listen to teachers that are not objective in their relaying of information, particularly theories. Despite it all, I have chosen a path to follow, one that, through reason, has been proven true in my life.

Think of it this way, when do you stop digging once you have found the answer to a question? When do you simply accept an answer and move on to the next big question? I saw my teacher as one who had found the answer, the treasure he had been digging for, and instead of taking the treasure chest out of the hole and opening it, he had tossed it aside saying, “that isn’t it! there must be more!”

How long will he be searching for an answer he desires? At this rate, he may just spend his entire life in such uncertainty and die knowing only that he doesn’t know. If that is considered open-mindedness, then I want no part in it. Truth is not that unobtainable, nor is it relative to the individual. Truth is merely truth and it doesn’t change, and all the truth that matters to us can be found if one searches for it honestly. If we search for truth objectively, willing to accept it even if it is painful to us or not what we originally thought it would be.

In school, I was taught that popular science made up ALL science when in reality such science is popular only because it fits with mankind’s desire to promote atheism or self. Think about it, there have been many scientists in history that were ridiculed by society, only to be proven true much later in time. I believe there are many scientists today that stand for such truth but are not allowed to voice it.

Scientists like Galileo and Newton, or Gregor Mendel (Father of Genetics), Louis Pasteur (Father of Microbiology), George Carver, and Carl Linnaeus (Father of Taxonomy), were Christians, viewing science as the means in which God created life. That only a God could create something so masterfully and complex.

One only need to do a bit of searching to find such influential scientists today, some of which can be seen in the documentary series Is Genesis History? Unpopular science can be found at the Creation Museum, in Petersburg Kentucky which is a 75,000 sq ft facility welcoming over 3.5 million guests since its start in 2007. Located a few miles away is the Ark Encounter, which also adds credence to Biblical history and the scientists today that uphold it.

You were not made to live in doubt, and even if you believe that the path you have chosen is based on scientific proof alone, I challenge you by saying that all belief requires faith. Science and Religion clash because there are things that we will never find the answer to in this life. The mysteries, so to speak, of the universe that we are limited in understanding fully.

The big bang is merely a theory and will remain one since we can’t recreate or test such a theory. Therefore to believe in it requires faith, and I’d go as far as to say that it requires more faith to believe in such an occurrence because it’s very foundation is based on chance, or more specifically, a mistake.

In the end, only you can decide but don’t take this decision lightly…it is the most important decision you will ever make, and it’s effect envelopes more than this short life.

Some great references to look into:

  1. “I Don’t Have Enough Faith to Be an Atheist” –by Frank Turek/Norman Geisler
  2. Why I Am A Christian” – by Norman Geisler/Paul K. Hoffman
  3. “This We Believe” – by John Akers/John Armstrong/ John Woodbridge
  4. John Lennox: The Question of Science and God-Part 1/2 –Video conversation with Eric Metaxas, Link: Part 1 Part 2
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3 thoughts on “Science and Religion: Opposing Forces?

  1. “Think of it this way, when do you stop digging once you have found the answer to a question? When do you simply accept an answer and move on to the next big question? I saw my teacher as one who had found the answer, the treasure he had been digging for, and instead of taking the treasure chest out of the hole and opening it, he had tossed it aside saying, “that isn’t it! there must be more!” ”
    What a brilliant way of explaining this flawed concept of “open-mindedness”! You’re right, once we have the answer we don’t have to keep trying out other answers, but how many people do that, possibly to be politically correct? What’s wrong with saying, “There’s only one answer, and I’ve found it.”? Loved your reference to people who were laughed at in their time, but turned out to be right. – Loved the whole piece.

    Liked by 2 people

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